The Etihad Museum: an architectural walkthrough

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Over the weekend, I went to the Etihad Museum located along Jumeirah street in Dubai. It was a bit out of the way from my apartment– I had to ride the metro, walk to a bus stop, and figure out how to board the right vehicle. Had this been in New York, I would have just walked the entire way through, but with the heat coming into full swing over the summer, that would have practically killed me. Regardless, mass transportation is one of the things I enjoy most about developed cities. Figuring everything out, asking locals for directions, and observing building profiles from high-speed vehicles– I don’t get to do any of this in my own country.

Off to the building lobby I went, where a tour group composed of various expats awaited the local guides. After purchasing student tickets, I proceeded to the central hall where a lovely Arab local volunteer (whose name I didn’t catch!) had appeared. He would be touring us to comply with his company’s chosen value for the year: generosity. Out of respect, I didn’t include his face in any of my photos.

He began the tour with this basic question: what did the Etihad museum resemble when viewed from the outside? I thought of the slanted glass panes, the curving roof panels, and only the name of the late Zaha Hadid surfaced in my mind. Still, it couldn’t have been her; I’d surely have known had that been the case.

The guide held a piece of paper between his index finger and thumb. He pinched its two edges together and let the rest of the paper form a loop, such that no crease appeared on the sheet.

‘If you noticed the shape of the museum, it looks something like this!’

(At this point, I was like ‘????’)

After a minute, I kind of grasped what he was talking about. No, the building wasn’t exactly a loop; it rather resembled a cracked eggshell. Visually, it was something you could easily explain to the public and have fun with. Anything more straightforward might’ve been tacky, and very much Beijing if you asked me. (Not that I dislike Beijing! I just noticed how modern Chinese architecture is so literal. To apply this aesthetic to any other part of the world is iffy at best).

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I wasn’t really able to take a photo of the entire building exterior, but have a look at this distorted angle.

The museum is actually underground, and the building visible from outside is just the entrance lobby. I liked the programming of the spaces, as you can imagine yourself standing over some kind of underground city when you enter.

Continue reading “The Etihad Museum: an architectural walkthrough”

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What Shapes Architecture

Reaction Paper: What Shapes Architecture
by: Bea C.

            In evaluating the different architectural movements that have flooded Europe, one will get a rich picture of the localities that comprise the continent—the history, culture, and residents of an area. As demonstrated in the video documentaries, the architectural styles (Baroque, Renaissance, Rococo, Gothic) of Europe did not simply spring out of an individual’s mind; rather, these styles were shaped by unique realities of the region. Architecture, while a beautiful creation of man, is also a statement. Each style carries with itself a distinct personality ingrained with its history.

The dramatic and occasionally gruesome Baroque architecture, for example, blurs the lines between art and the onlooker; between the imaginary and reality. It is a physical manifestation of the Protestant movement’s effect on the church at that time—dark and edgy, after having turned away from the Catholic rule. Baroque architecture seems to pull onlookers into itself instead of taking a passive role. Continue reading “What Shapes Architecture”